But at these times and these places important things Happened:

Lacrosse’s Historical Timeline

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Historical Timeline

wdt_IDDatecircaEventScopeRegionFirst NationsLinks 
11931~The first box lacrosse games in BC were played at the PNE (in the old Horse Show Building) and at Queens Park Arena.box
origins
British Columbia
21931~C.A.L.A adopted box lacrosse as its official gamebox
rules
Canada
31967This World Field Lacrosse Championship really began the concept of international play.This World Field Lacrosse Championship
international
Canada
41100~There is speculation that a version of lacrosse may have been played in Mesoamerica or Mexico as early as the 1100sIndigenous

North America
Mesoamerica
Mexico
51100Deeply rooted in Native American history, the sport dates back to as early as the 12th century when indigenous people played it for community and religious purposes. It was and still is viewed by many as a gift from the Creator; a game intertwined with enjoyment and healing purposes as the medicine game.origins
medicine game
First Nations
61400~Tyendinaga - Birthplace of the Peacemaker: Pacemaker was later to meet MohawksBaggatawayFirst Nations
Mohawk
71600~Lacrosse style religious and/or combative events were played in many different parts of North America. Two of these, "Baggataway" and "Tewaarathon" are perhaps the most documented with Baggataway becoming a recreational game with between 60 and 100 players per side.Baggataway
Tewaarathon
origins
First Nations
81630~There is not much early data on lacrosse and that exists (from missionaries such as French Jesuits in Huron country in the 1630s and later English explorers, such as Jonathan Carver in the mid-eighteenth century Great Lakes area) is often conflicting.originsFirst Nations
Huron
91630~There seems to have been three basic forms of lacrosse — the southeastern, Great Lakes, and Iroquoian.originsFirst Nations
Iroquois
101630~Among southeastern tribes (Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek, Seminole, Yuchi and others), a double-stick version of the game is still practiced. A two-and-a half foot stick is held in each hand, and the soft, small deerskin ball is retrieved and cupped between them.Stickball
equipment
ball
origins
First Nations
Cherokee
Choctaw
Chickasaw
Creek
Seminole
Yuchi
111630~Great Lakes players used a single three-foot stick. terminating in a round, closed pocket about three to four inches in diameter, only a little larger than the ball., In this game, the ball was usually made of wood, charred and scraped to shape.equipment 
stickball
121630The northeastern stick, found among Iroquoian and New England tribes, is the progenitor of all present-day sticks, both in box as well as field lacrosse. The stick for this game was typically more than three feet long and—the shaft ended with a crook which supported a flat triangular surface of webbingequipment
stick
Iroquois
131636After seeing the Huron Indians play lacrosse as a medicinal rite, Jean De Brebuef, a Jesuit missionary, is the first to document lacrosse (baggataway) at Georgian Bay, OntarioBaggataway
origins
medicine game
Ontario
Georgian Bay, OntarioFirst Nations
Hurons
https://laxhall.com/2023/05/01-365h-anniversary-coin/
141718Participation of French in lacrosse games noted in great lakes region:

Near present day Detroit, Monsieur de Sabrevois, commandant of Fort Pontchartrain, penned a description of the region in 1718. Referring to the Potawatomi village located near the fort, he wrote:

In summer they play a great deal at la crosse, twenty or more on each side. Their bat [crosse] is a sort of small racket, and the ball with which they Play is of very Heavy wood, a little larger than the balls we use in Tennis. ...

All this is very diverting and interesting to behold. Often one Village Plays against another, the poux [Potawatomi] against the outaouacs [Ottawa] or the hurons, for very considerable prizes. The French frequently take part in these games.
origins
French
equipment
stick
ball

First Nations
Hurons
Potawatomi  
Outaouacs  
181718(cited in Lacrosse: Michigan's First Team Sport by Larry B. Massie as published in Michigan History Magazine, September/October 1997 available online at: LaxRules.com)origins
French
USA
Michigan, USAFirst Nations
Potawatomi  
Outaouacs  
Hurons
191763Ojibway Indians use baggataway as a cover to enter and capture Fort MichilimackinacUSA
Baggataway
Fort Michilimackinac, USAFirst Nations
Ojibway
201794During a friendly match between the Senecas of New York and the Mohawks of Ontario at Grand River, a Mohawk player strikes and injures as Seneca player with his stick. This match begins to shape the rules for lacrosse. After a meeting of the Council of Chiefs, the Senecas and Mohawks agree to a rematch to be played three years later.rules


origins
Ontario
New York
First Nations
Seneca
Mohawk
211799Salmanaca - Handsome Lake vision occursFirst Nations
221800~Ball and Stick game played by Nations of the interior of British Columbia (Society of North American Hockey Historians and Researchers)origins
British Columbia
British ColumbiaFirst Nations
231815Onondaga  - Burial place of Handsome LakeFirst Nations
Onondaga
241834Caughnawaga Indians demonstrate the sport at St. Pierre to a large crowd of Montreal spectators and the game is reported by the newspaper.originsMontreal
St. Pierre
First Nations
Kahnawake
(Caughnawaga)
Mohawk
251842First Montreal Olympic Athletic club lacrosse team.Club
origins
club
Montreal Olympic Athletic Club
Montreal, Quebec
261843First lacrosse game between Indians and non-Indian teamsoriginsQuebecFirst Nations
271844Montreal's Olympic Club organized a team in 1844, specifically to play a match against a Native American team. Similar games were played in 1848 and 1851.Olympic ClubMontrealFirst Nations
281855In 1855, Paul Kane described the Chinook and SqWuqWu’b3sh (Skokomish) of present-day Washington as taking great pleasure in a stick-and-ball game that was closely related to those of the Nêhiyawak, Anishinaabeg, and the Dakhóta/Lakȟóta (Dakota/LakotaWashington, USAFirst Nations
Chinook
SqWuqWu’b3sh (Skokomish)
Nêhiyawak
Anishinaabeg
Dakhóta/Lakȟóta (Dakota/Lakota)
DatecircaEventScopeRegionFirst Nations

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